Studio Stories: Building Blocks

About Studio Stories

Knowing that many blog readers are also subscribers, I want to say thank you for inviting me into your inbox. So when I create a Studio Stories post there will also be some extra content – the ‘studio story’ behind the project – sent directly to newsletter subscribers. If you would like to receive my Studio Stories, as well as news of new work, events and classes, then just sign up below.

You can read my privacy policy here.

 

Blocks are not Bricks

I don’t know about you, but to me the word ‘blocks’ does not sound terribly promising. It suggests something hard and unyielding, either in primary-coloured plastic, like a lego brick, or rough grey cement and cinders, like a breeze block. These are not the associations I want to bring to my weaving!

Fortunately, at the loom the block is anything but rigid. It is a really flexible design tool with applications to every kind of weaving, from rugs to scarves to works of art. Over the next few weeks I am going to share a series of posts around the theme of building with blocks.

It’s a big topic, so I am going to approach it through an example. I am going to reflect on a design which I called Highland Summer, and unpick some of the key steps which took this design from an idea to a draft to a collection of lace scarves.

The shape of a Highland Summer

This is not a detective story, so there is no need for suspense. Here are the profile drafts* I came up with for three different designs on the same threading.

What’s going on here? Well, I will be sharing more background information – as well as the original 16-shaft drafts – exclusively with subscribers in my newsletter next week, so do sign up before the end of Tuesday 16 June if you’d like to receive those.

Don’t worry if you’re not weaving on 16 shafts. I’ll be back here on the blog every week for the next four weeks talking through the process and how it can work for any number of shafts.

For the first post in the series, I will look at the thorny question of ‘where the ideas come from’ – you don’t need any shafts at all for that one! In the second and third posts, I will get into the practical business of planning a block design and turning it into a draft. And in the final post I will get practical in another way, by offering some specific tips for weaving lace – my favourite summer structure.

*What is a profile draft? I’ll be getting to that in part two of the series!

First posted on weavingspace.co.uk © Cally Booker

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.